Escape

Why Worry About Our Teens?

Break the ChainNationwide surveys have examined teen dating relationships and experiences, and specific findings from these surveys include the following:

Two in five tweens (ages 11-14) in relationships know friends who have been verbally abused – called names, put down, or insulted – via cell phone, IM, or social networking sites (MySpace, Facebook, etc.) (Liz Claiborne Inc and National Dating Abuse Hotline study on tween and teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2008)

Nearly one in three teens who have been in relationships have experienced the most serious forms of dating violence and abuse including sexual abuse, physical abuse, or threats of physical harm to a partner or self (Liz Claiborne Inc and Family Violence Prevention Fund study on teen dating violence and abuse linked to the troubled economy conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, June 2009)

More than one in three teens reported that their partners wanted to know where they were and who they were with all the time (Liz Claiborne Inc and National Dating Abuse Hotline study on tween and teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2008)

Only half of all tweens (ages 11-14) claim to know the warning signs of a bad/hurtful relationship (Liz Claiborne Inc and National Dating Abuse Hotline study on tween and teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2008)

Nearly 1 in 4 tweens (ages 11-14) say boyfriend/girlfriend relationships usually begin at age 14 or younger (Liz Claiborne Inc and National Dating Abuse Hotline study on tween and teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2008)

Females ages 16-24 are more vulnerable to intimate partner violence than any other age group – at a rate almost triple the national average (US Dept of Justice Stats, Special Report: Intimate Partner Violence and Age of Victims)

58% of rape victims report being raped between the ages of 12-24 (US Department of Health and Human Services, 2002)

Half of reported date rapes occur among teenagers (California Coalition Against Sexual Assault, 2002)

Almost half of teens have personally been victimized by controlling behaviors (Liz Claiborne Inc and Family Violence Prevention Fund study on teen dating violence and abuse linked to the troubled economy conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, June 2009)

25% of teens report having a course on dating abuse in school (Liz Claiborne Inc and Family Violence Prevention Fund study on teen dating violence and abuse linked to the troubled economy conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, June 2009)

Among teens who said they took a course on dating abuse, 75% say it helped them learn about the signs of abusive relationships (Liz Claiborne Inc. and Family Violence Prevention Fund study on teen dating violence and abuse linked to the troubled economy conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, June 2009)

PARENTAL AWARENESS:

81% of parents either believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don’t know if it is an issue (Family Violence Prevention Fund & Advocates of Youth, 2004)

54% of parents admitted they had not spoken to their child about dating violence (Empower Program, conducted by Knowledge Networks, Social Control, Verbal Abuse, and Violence Among Teenagers, 2000)

  • About 72% of eighth and ninth graders are “dating”.
  • The severity of intimate partner violence is often greater in cases where the pattern of abuse was established in adolescence.
  • Violent behavior typically begins between the ages of 12 and 18.
  • Girls and young women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rate of intimate partner violence — almost triple the national average.

One response to “Why Worry About Our Teens?”

  1. Helping Your Teen Avoid Dating Violence | Crimesense Magazine

    [...] fact, a recent study reports that nearly 1 in 3 teens who have been in dating relationships report experiencing the most serious [...]

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